Dubrovnik

Dubrovnik

There are many beautiful places in the world, however the people of Dubrovnik claim their city to be the most beautiful. A warm southern climate, spacious blue skies, emerald green and dark blue crystal-clear sea touching the rocky shore and spilling into numerous coves and bays, onto sandy beaches and steep reefs decorated with the lushest Mediterranean and subtropical flora.

Under the mild Mediterranean climate, Dubrovnik is bathed in a sea of sun, blossoms and ripe orange and lemon tree fruit, even in the winter months. There are more than 250 sunny days per year, the average annual temperature is about 17°C, with the mean winter and summer temperatures being 10°C and 26°C respectively. The average summer sea temperature is about 21°C.

Dubrovnik

is under UNESCO protection. According to records, the area around Dubrovnik was first inhabited somewhere between 6000 and 2000 BC. The existence of the city was lost in the cloudy course of history, with legend and historical facts being meshed together. The lack of any preserved documents makes the whole pinpointing process harder, and the few historians that are researching this topic are left with the task to distinguish fact from fiction.
What is certain is that Dubrovnik is an old city, persevering on its stony cliffs for at least 14 centuries. An even older city, Epidaurum, predates Dubrovnik, being located where the city of Cavtat now lies, about 18 kilometres southeast of Dubrovnik. At the time of its destruction it had endured for at least 10 to 12 centuries. Again, historians cannot be sure. Some believe that the Greeks founded the colony around 600BC. With the city destroyed, a number of its inhabitants fled to neighbouring regions (today’s Župa Dubrovačka), where the fortified cities of Spilan and Gradac (Burnum) were inhabited, as well as the rocky islet of Laus, which became the first city core of old Dubrovnik.